Rate the last book you just read

Started by Drunken Idaho, October 12, 2011, 12:55:25 AM

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Guillermo

Quote from: Shibboleth on April 10, 2023, 04:45:36 PMI am reading a LitRPG series called, "He Who Fights Monsters" the author must be a skeptic because he challenges gods and power, has quoted logical fallacies, and Carl Sagan.

I would classify it as pulp-Fantasy. Super fun light reading.
FYI. Books 4,6, and 7 are 80% off on audible at this moment.

Shibboleth

Quote from: Guillermo on April 11, 2023, 11:02:29 AM
Quote from: Shibboleth on April 10, 2023, 04:45:36 PMI am reading a LitRPG series called, "He Who Fights Monsters" the author must be a skeptic because he challenges gods and power, has quoted logical fallacies, and Carl Sagan.

I would classify it as pulp-Fantasy. Super fun light reading.
FYI. Books 4,6, and 7 are 80% off on audible at this moment.

Thank you.

Guillermo

Also, We Are Legion (We are Bob) and the rest of the Bobiverse series is on sale on Audible. I highly recommend.

Guillermo

I'm Sorry if people are annoyed at this, But its a Great Sale on Audible. The First four Books of Malazan: Book of the Fallen is on sale about 75% off.

I'll finish browsing before continuing this post.

Agatha Christie and Terry Pratchett have some books for sale. So good stuff there.

Now I'm done. Great Sale this time around.

Sawyer

#1369
Halfway through Naomi Oreskes and Eric Conway's new book, The Big Myth.  10/10.  Everyone should read this book.

I'm assuming most of us here have already read Oreskes and Conway's previous collaboration, Merchants of Doubt.  There is no better book on the birth of climate science denial, and the amalgamation of all sorts of environmental science denial with Cold War conservatism.  The Big Myth travels backwards in time a generation and drastically expands its scope to examine the emergence of free market fundamentalism among economists, business leaders, and its ultimate invasion into popular culture. 

Think Ayn Rand is the most influential libertarian writer from the 40s?  I don't want to spoil the surprise, but there is a popular children's author that is far more deserving of that title.  It's hard to keep track of all the business leaders in the 30s that sink into full-on paranoid delusions in response to the New Deal, but unfortunately for us, they were still pretty damn competent at churning out effective political propaganda.  Some great stuff in here about just how many transformations von Mises and Hayak's work undergoes (which was already on shaky grounds with most economists to begin with) to sell it to an unwitting audience in the pages of Reader's Digest.  I vaguely recalled reading about NAM in Rick Perlstein's Goldwater book but had no idea of the level of domination they exerted on popular discourse in newspapers, television, and radio.

I can link to the Majority Report interview if people want a fast and dirty version (Oreskes always does a fantastic job summarizing her work), but I think it's worth shelling out for the book.  In fact it's downright un-American NOT to buy it - you're violating the "tripod of freedom" by forgoing capitalist consumption.

EDIT - If you're truly insane you can pair this with Jennifer Berkshire's A Wolf At the Schoolhouse Door like I did.  That way your hope of solving economic illiteracy through quality education will completely evaporate.   :patriot:

Guillermo

He Who Fights with Monsters 2 - Shirtaloon: (10/10) highly recommended for anybody who likes the genre. It is a basic continuation of the previous book. And it can be read as a continuum. Looking forward to the following 9 volumes. Geesh.

Singularity Trap - Dennis E Taylor: (7/10). I really liked his Bobiverse series. This is a much more serious book, yet the style and prose are identical to his other works with a major comical component. This book is hindered by that comedic angle and would have been better if it was 100% serious. It has a very interesting premise well worth the read though.

Endymion / Rise of Endymion - Dan Simmons: (10/10) I love this series. This is a must-read. When I got into Hyperion, I didn't know what to expect and was delighted. Then Endymiom comes and starts: "Are you here to read what happened to our heroes at the end of the last book, well, tough luck it's not here, this is a different story 200 years later. Kbyethxs. And then you realize that these two are the actual real books for the series. The previous two were prequels/setup. Wonderful.


arthwollipot

I'm only a little way into it yet, but I can heartily recommend this one:

Immune: A journey into the mysterious system that keeps you alive by Philipp Dettmer (creator of the YouTube channel Kurzgesagt - In A Nutshell)

It's basically a passion project by someone who knows how to turn a phrase. It explores the astoundingly complex world of the human immune system, in clear, simple, and bordering on Adamsian language that is very easy to read. There is also a copious number of full-colour illustrations, though so far I've seen no birds. As I'm reading it I can't help but hear the words narrated in Steve Taylor's calm, measured, very English voice.

Absolutely fascinating and tremendously entertaining.
We are living in weird times
dominated by weird people
who talk about weird shit

- Seth Meyers

Guillermo

He Who Fights with Monsters 3 to 5 - Shirtaloon (10/10) I've been seriously binging this series. I am completely engaged and enjoy the narrative and the characters. Some people do not like it, but I think it has a certain quirk that makes it appealing if you catch it. Book 5 has a bit of a lull through the middle.

Project Hail Mary - Andy Weir (10/10) Hell yes. This is what I wanted. I read Artemis and felt underwhelmed. it was a good story and well-written but it was lacking the magic of the Martian. This book is exactly that. This is how a book about a scientist should be. Similar to how the Bobiverse is a series for engineers. This is for scientists and engineers. I wonder why it took me this long to read this book.

I wonder how many books have I read this year. Let's check. Interesting, Audible doesn't have a way to tell you when you finished a book. My estimate is around 12-13, at least according to my posts here.

Guillermo

#1373
Quote from: arthwollipot on June 01, 2023, 02:46:46 AMI'm only a little way into it yet, but I can heartily recommend this one:

Immune: A journey into the mysterious system that keeps you alive by Philipp Dettmer (creator of the YouTube channel Kurzgesagt - In A Nutshell)

It's basically a passion project by someone who knows how to turn a phrase. It explores the astoundingly complex world of the human immune system, in clear, simple, and bordering on Adamsian language that is very easy to read. There is also a copious number of full-colour illustrations, though so far I've seen no birds. As I'm reading it I can't help but hear the words narrated in Steve Taylor's calm, measured, very English voice.

Absolutely fascinating and tremendously entertaining.
Oh, yes, I have been very interested in this one. Is it more picture book than text, or more textbook type?  Also, is it worth it on hardcover or audible?

arthwollipot

Quote from: Guillermo on June 16, 2023, 11:23:55 AM
Quote from: arthwollipot on June 01, 2023, 02:46:46 AMI'm only a little way into it yet, but I can heartily recommend this one:

Immune: A journey into the mysterious system that keeps you alive by Philipp Dettmer (creator of the YouTube channel Kurzgesagt - In A Nutshell)

It's basically a passion project by someone who knows how to turn a phrase. It explores the astoundingly complex world of the human immune system, in clear, simple, and bordering on Adamsian language that is very easy to read. There is also a copious number of full-colour illustrations, though so far I've seen no birds. As I'm reading it I can't help but hear the words narrated in Steve Taylor's calm, measured, very English voice.

Absolutely fascinating and tremendously entertaining.
Oh, yes, I have been very interested in this one. Is it more picture book than text, or more textbook type?  Also, is it worth it on hardcover or audible?

It is lavishly illustrated, but it is primarily a text book. Very worth getting the hardcover for the illustrations, but they don't stand alone without the text. I have no experience with audio books so I can't judge that.
We are living in weird times
dominated by weird people
who talk about weird shit

- Seth Meyers

Sawyer

#1375
I've failed to entice anyone on my two Discord book channels to join me on a plunge into madness with another 900 page biography, but maybe 3rd time is a charm.

https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/239356

The Kingfish.  Basically if you took every paranoid nightmare of today's right-wing nut and crammed them into a single person, you'd get Huey Long.  Comes out swinging at the existing aristocracy of Louisiana in the 1920s, squeezes big oil companies, pretty much threatens to tank the entire economy of the state whenever anyone puts up the slightest opposition to his plans, makes up his own legal theories to justify paying for school textbooks and new bridges and somehow usually gets judges to go along with them ... the guy just plows through every single barrier that is put in his way.  At least google the Bloody Monday incident in the Lousiana House if you don't want to read the book - seems like something out of Dr. Strangelove.

Not sure yet if this quite rises to my gold standard of Robert Caro books but it definitely is in the pantheon of must-read biographies about power-obsessed American politicians.

arthwollipot

I was looking for something to read, so I did a Google search for "best modern science fiction". The one book that came up on all the review sites was The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu.

Originally written in Chinese, but well-translated into English, there are a few stylistic quirks that I found a bit hard to get used to. It also starts pretty slow, and I was about halfway through before I worked out what was actually going on. Once I got that far, though, the hook was pretty strong.

It's the first book of a series, and I've so far finished The Dark Forest and have just started on Death's End. So far the series is about an 7.5/10 for me. Well worth reading, but not the most engaging book I've read recently.
We are living in weird times
dominated by weird people
who talk about weird shit

- Seth Meyers

Friendly Angel

Quote from: arthwollipot on June 21, 2023, 09:33:04 PMI was looking for something to read, so I did a Google search for "best modern science fiction". The one book that came up on all the review sites was The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu.


Yeah, several people (and Amazon) have recommended that one to me. I downloaded the free preview for my Kindle but it didn't grab me for some reason... maybe a poor choice of snip.
Amend and resubmit.

arthwollipot

Quote from: Friendly Angel on June 21, 2023, 11:33:46 PM
Quote from: arthwollipot on June 21, 2023, 09:33:04 PMI was looking for something to read, so I did a Google search for "best modern science fiction". The one book that came up on all the review sites was The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu.


Yeah, several people (and Amazon) have recommended that one to me. I downloaded the free preview for my Kindle but it didn't grab me for some reason... maybe a poor choice of snip.

I'd say give it a go. Like I said, it takes a long time to get going. I was thinking "wtf am I reading" for quite a while but I stuck with it and so far it has been rewarding.
We are living in weird times
dominated by weird people
who talk about weird shit

- Seth Meyers

Tassie Dave

#1379
I loved "Three-Body Problem" it was a 5/5 book for me.

The sequel "The Dark Forest", I also really liked 4/5

I had a few problems with where Book 3 went to philosophically and literally. I didn't feel the science was as solid as the first 2 books. Still a solid 3/5 read.

I will recommend the Chinese made TV series of the first book. It is a bit slow early on, but it does pick up pace later on.

The whole 30 episodes have been released on Youtube for free (Legally) They were released early for subscribers every week then after a few weeks made available to everyone. Which was good as the subscriber model wasn't available to us Aussies, but once made free, we could watch them.

Here is the playlist for the whole 30 episodes.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMX26aiIvX5rFSYPXtcqda3tWd6pGVD5Q

There is another version being released by Netflix in January 2024. Here is the trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lj99Uz1d50